Open Call: Arts Commission

Prisoners, Medical Care and Entitlement to Health in England and Ireland 1850-2000 is looking for an expert partner(s) with whom to generate an Arts project(s) that will primarily work with prisoners within the English prison system, but might also touch upon prisoners’ families and ex-prisoners post-release. The selected partner(s) will work with Professor Hilary Marland’s team at the Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick

Key things to consider

  • The project must be focussed on work within prison, but we also hope for some sort of external public sharing – which might be an event, exhibition, panel discussion, seminar etc.
  • We are open to practically any art form (in its widest sense) that you think you could take into a prison: theatre, writing, dance, music, singing, reading, painting, photography, drawing, debating, digital, radio, collage, object handling etc. It might even be a project which is more ‘think-y’ and less ‘output-y’ – there don’t have to be physical outcomes like paintings or theatre pieces.
  • We need to know the evaluation methods – what did we (you and us) and participants learn? How did it change us all? What implications might it have for prisons, mental health, physical or spiritual health? What policy outcomes are there?
  • The project must have completed its work within and outside prison by Summer 2018; the finding / results / observations will feed into a policy event in Autumn 2018.
  • The partner(s) must be willing and able to talk about the project at the Autumn policy event.

The commission(s) is fully funded, and open to organisations already working in the prison estate. Read the full brief here

Please send applications to Flo Swann, Public Engagement Officer at f.swann.1@warwick.ac.uk

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch with Flo if you would like to have an informal chat prior to submitting an application.

Applications must be received by Sunday 25th June at midnight.

Image credit:Wakefield Training Prison and Camp- Everyday Life in a British Prison, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, 1944. Creative Commons.

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